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Sampling Fields for SCN - 10/16/2014

Crisp, clear fall days are perfect for splitting firewood, tilling the garden under and collecting soil samples to check fields for the soybean cyst nematode (SCN). Although soil sampling for SCN might not be on most people’s list of favorite autumn chores, fall is a great time to sample fields for this pest. Reasons to sample for SCN include to check for the presence of the nematode in fields and to monitor SCN numbers in fields known to be infested with the pest.

SCN Females Apparent on Infected Soybean Roots - 6/11/2014

The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) remains a leading yield robber of soybeans in Iowa and much of the Midwest. The presence of SCN in the field may not be apparent by appearance of visual symptoms (aboveground stunting and/or yellowing) for years after the nematode is introduced in a field. An easy way to check fields for the presence of SCN during the growing season is to look for telltale swollen, white SCN females on soybean roots. The SCN females are small, about the size of a period at the end of a sentence on a printed page.

High SCN Numbers in 2014 - 2/10/2014

It is hard to think about planting crops with the brutally cold weather we have been experiencing in Iowa the past several weeks. But warm weather and planting season will be here in a matter of weeks. As plans are being made for the 2014 crops, farmers and agronomists should be aware that fields planted to soybeans this year may have unusually high soybean cyst nematode (SCN) numbers if soybeans were grown in the fields in 2012. The number of SCN eggs in the soil at the time of planting is a major factor determining how much damage and yield loss SCN will cause.

Sample Fields for Soybean Cyst Nematode - 10/25/2013

As we work to complete harvest and put the finishing touches on the 2013 growing season, it is not too early to start thinking about 2014 crops. Results of soil samples collected in the next few weeks from fields in which soybeans will be grown in 2014 could mean the difference between “so-so” and profitable yields next year.

Soybean Cyst Nematode Reproduction 2012 - 12/18/2012

The amount of damage caused by the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is determined, in large part, by the population densities or numbers of the nematode present in the field. More severe yield losses generally occur in fields with high SCN population densities compared to damage in fields with low or moderate numbers of SCN. Long-term, profitable soybean production in fields infested with SCN requires growing SCN-resistant soybeans and nonhost crops, such as corn, to keep nematode population densities in check

SCN-Resistant Soybean Varieties - 10/17/2012

Profitable soybean yields can be produced in fields infested with the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) by growing SCN-resistant soybean varieties. SCN-resistant soybeans can keep SCN population densities from increasing and produce high yields. Each year, Iowa State University compiles a list of SCN-resistant soybean varieties that are available to Iowa soybean farmers for the upcoming growing season. The list is published with support from the Iowa Soybean Association.

Soybean Cyst Nematodes Females on Soybeans - 6/7/2012

The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is one of the most serious soil-borne pathogens of soybean in Iowa and throughout the Midwest. Juveniles of this microscopic worm hatch from eggs in the spring, then burrow into soybean roots, where they attach to the vascular tissue of the plant and feed. Developing SCN females get progressively larger as they mature, until their fully expanded, lemon-shaped bodies rupture out of the root and become visible on the root surface.

Spring SCN Soil Sampling - 2/21/2012

Although the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is one of the most persistent and destructive pests of soybean in Iowa and the Midwest, the potential to underestimate the nematode’s yield-reducing effects is great because damage from SCN is not readily apparent in the field during growing seasons with adequate to excess moisture. The need to take the threat of SCN seriously was recently reviewed in an ICM News article. Fortunately, fields can be checked for the presence of SCN in the spring through soil sampling.

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