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Scouting SCN - 6/21/2011

A very quick and easy way to check for the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is to dig roots and look for the presence of the telltale, swollen, white females on soybean roots. This technique is effective for checking fields for the presence of this serious yield-limiting pest and also for checking to see if SCN populations are building up on SCN-resistant soybean varieties.

Trial Results Show Dual Benefits of SCN Resistance - 1/17/2014

The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) continues to be a major yield-reducing pathogen of soybeans in Iowa, and it occurs in up to 75 percent of fields in the state. Growing SCN-resistant soybeans is an important part of managing SCN. Results from Iowa State University’s nine SCN-resistant variety trial experiments in 2013 illustrate how resistant varieties can produce high yields and suppress the buildup of the nematode in infested fields.

Possible Breakdown of SCN Resistance - 7/28/2012

Iowa farmers produce soybeans profitably in fields infested with the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) by growing SCN-resistant soybean varieties that yield well and prevent large increases in SCN egg population densities. There are hundreds of SCN-resistant soybean varieties for Iowa. Almost all of the varieties contain SCN resistance genes from a single breeding line, called PI 88788. Because of widespread, repeated use of varieties with the same PI 88788 source of resistance, many SCN populations have developed increased reproduction on that type of resistance.

2012 Season and SCN - 2/20/2012

The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is one of Iowa’s most serious and persistent soybean pests. The nematode has the potential to cause devastating yield losses, population densities can increase very rapidly within a single growing season, and dormant eggs can survive for more than a decade in infested soils in the absence of soybeans. Random surveys funded by the soybean checkoff in 1995-1996 and again in 2006-2007 revealed that 70 to 75 percent of fields in Iowa are infested with the nematode.

Fall Scouting for SCN - 11/11/2011

Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic worms that live in the soil and feed on plant roots. Nematodes that feed on corn occur in almost every field in Iowa, but most do not reduce corn yields measurably until they increase to high population densities (numbers). Fall is not a recommended time to check fields for damaging population densities of nematodes that feed on corn.

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