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Sampling to evaluate the success of an SCN management program

Recommended technique: Collect soil samples and have the SCN population densities determined.

When to sample
You can take a soil sample to check on the progress of a SCN management plan at almost any time of the year. But if you want to monitor the effectiveness of your SCN management program over several years, you should sample at the same point in the management program each time (say after a year of resistant soybeans or nonhost crop).

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SCN Females Apparent on Infected Soybean Roots - 6/11/2014

The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) remains a leading yield robber of soybeans in Iowa and much of the Midwest. The presence of SCN in the field may not be apparent by appearance of visual symptoms (aboveground stunting and/or yellowing) for years after the nematode is introduced in a field. An easy way to check fields for the presence of SCN during the growing season is to look for telltale swollen, white SCN females on soybean roots. The SCN females are small, about the size of a period at the end of a sentence on a printed page.

Sample Fields for Soybean Cyst Nematode - 10/25/2013

As we work to complete harvest and put the finishing touches on the 2013 growing season, it is not too early to start thinking about 2014 crops. Results of soil samples collected in the next few weeks from fields in which soybeans will be grown in 2014 could mean the difference between “so-so” and profitable yields next year.

Spring SCN Soil Sampling - 2/21/2012

Although the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is one of the most persistent and destructive pests of soybean in Iowa and the Midwest, the potential to underestimate the nematode’s yield-reducing effects is great because damage from SCN is not readily apparent in the field during growing seasons with adequate to excess moisture. The need to take the threat of SCN seriously was recently reviewed in an ICM News article. Fortunately, fields can be checked for the presence of SCN in the spring through soil sampling.

Fall Scouting for SCN - 11/11/2011

Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic worms that live in the soil and feed on plant roots. Nematodes that feed on corn occur in almost every field in Iowa, but most do not reduce corn yields measurably until they increase to high population densities (numbers). Fall is not a recommended time to check fields for damaging population densities of nematodes that feed on corn.

Scout for Sudden Death Syndrome - 7/21/2011

In past years, sudden death syndrome (SDS) has appeared during the last week of July or the first week of August in Iowa. Therefore we anticipate symptoms of SDS will begin appearing in the state within the next couple of weeks. Although we do not expect SDS to be as widespread or as severe as the 2010 growing season, there have been some Iowa counties that have received higher-than-normal precipitation. We expect the risk of SDS in these counties to be higher since disease development is favored by wet conditions.

Scouting SCN - 6/21/2011

A very quick and easy way to check for the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is to dig roots and look for the presence of the telltale, swollen, white females on soybean roots. This technique is effective for checking fields for the presence of this serious yield-limiting pest and also for checking to see if SCN populations are building up on SCN-resistant soybean varieties.

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